Social Shaming

An interaction designer, Joshua Kaufman, had his MacBook stolen a few days back. He is a smart dude. He had installed an app called Hidden on his MacBook before it was stolen. He tracked down the thief and asked the Oakland PD to catch him. They said no. He was frustrated, obviously. He published all the details regarding the theft including the picture of the guy who stole his MacBook on his blog. This story went viral on Twitter and Facebook and made it almost impossible for the cops to ignore it. Oakland PD found the guy and arrested him. Since then the story has been picked up by many major media outlets and became sort of a sensation.

Social shaming works.

There's a fine line between peer pressure and social shaming. Many car dealerships in the US have a whiteboard that tracks which sales reps sold how many cars. They also ring a bell every time someone sells a car. It's a cheesy thing to do, but it sends a clear message to other people to be more aggressive; it's indeed a form of peer pressure. It's also an efficient technique to motivate the kids.

In fact, it's one of the most important gamification elements.

Public shaming has been used in many different ways e.g. send an email out to all the sales people with a list of people highlighted in red that haven't updated the CRM system. I know of a company that had a practice in place to publicly give a "D'oh! award" to a developer who broke the nightly build. Social shaming is essentially public shaming using social media. During my discussion with many enterprise social software vendors, analysts, and thought leaders I have repeatedly argued that changing end users' behavior is less likely to succeed unless there's a significant upside for the end users. What is more likely to work is codifying the real life end user behavior in the software that they use. Social shaming is one of those. One of the ways to achieve this could be by designing software that promotes radical transparency, signals one's successes to the other, and nudges them to excel without embarrassing them.

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